Ray Cadotte, 58, a member of the Ojibwa tribe who lives in Mount Pleasant, Mich., wore a traditional Woodland headdress in June at the Prairie Band Potawatomi Pow Wow in Mayetta, Kan.<252><137>was in his regalia during the annual Potawatomi Pow Wow on Saturday, June 14, in Mayetta, Kan.<252><137>
Ray Cadotte, 58, a member of the Ojibwa tribe who lives in Mount Pleasant, Mich., wore a traditional Woodland headdress in June at the Prairie Band Potawatomi Pow Wow in Mayetta, Kan.<252><137>was in his regalia during the annual Potawatomi Pow Wow on Saturday, June 14, in Mayetta, Kan.<252><137> SHANE KEYSER The Kansas City Star
Ray Cadotte, 58, a member of the Ojibwa tribe who lives in Mount Pleasant, Mich., wore a traditional Woodland headdress in June at the Prairie Band Potawatomi Pow Wow in Mayetta, Kan.<252><137>was in his regalia during the annual Potawatomi Pow Wow on Saturday, June 14, in Mayetta, Kan.<252><137> SHANE KEYSER The Kansas City Star

Native Americans gaining ground in their quest to educate public about traditional headdresses

August 05, 2014 7:00 PM

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