Living Columns & Blogs

Eat & Drink

Virtual beekeepers help save the honeybees

Concern about colony collapse among the honeybees spurred Bryan and Barbara Ritter of Garland, Kan., to leave leave their jobs in the Kansas City area and move to a farm about 100 miles south and become virtual beekeepers. Essentially we keep bees for others,” Barbara Ritter explained.

Eat & Drink

The bee savers: From city to country, these keepers are building buzz

Meet four people with a bee in their bonnets: virtual beekeepers Barbara and Bryan Ritter of Garland, Kan.; executive chef Kyle Williams, who tends a corporate-sponsored beehive at Blue Cross and Blue Shield in Kansas City; and John Speckman, a professional apiarist — or beekeeper — who lives in Shawnee and has a passion for educating beginners in the art of keeping honeybees.

House & Home

Garden mums provide the colors of fall

Gardeners look at mums as a garden-worthy plant while fall decorators think of the plant as disposable. Many people want this plant to do double duty — be a focal point of their displays and make its way out into the garden to rebloom the following year. Gardeners that want to ensure mums survive the winter in Kansas City should plant them in the spring.

Videos

Virtual beekeepers help save the honeybees

Concern about colony collapse among the honeybees spurred Bryan and Barbara Ritter of Garland, Kan., to leave leave their jobs in the Kansas City area and move to a farm about 100 miles south and become virtual beekeepers. Essentially we keep bees for others,” Barbara Ritter explained.
Tammy Ljungblad The Kansas City Star
Virtual beekeepers help save the honeybees 2:45

Virtual beekeepers help save the honeybees

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