She works at a hospital, yet even Jessica Salazar isn’t immune from a cellphone-related injury. Several months ago, she tripped on a curb while checking texts and emails. “I was trying to do too many things at once,” she explains. Salazar, who works in media relations at Overland Park Regional Medical Center, still wears a wrist brace because of lingering numbness from the injury.
She works at a hospital, yet even Jessica Salazar isn’t immune from a cellphone-related injury. Several months ago, she tripped on a curb while checking texts and emails. “I was trying to do too many things at once,” she explains. Salazar, who works in media relations at Overland Park Regional Medical Center, still wears a wrist brace because of lingering numbness from the injury. Joe Ledford jledford@kcstar.com
She works at a hospital, yet even Jessica Salazar isn’t immune from a cellphone-related injury. Several months ago, she tripped on a curb while checking texts and emails. “I was trying to do too many things at once,” she explains. Salazar, who works in media relations at Overland Park Regional Medical Center, still wears a wrist brace because of lingering numbness from the injury. Joe Ledford jledford@kcstar.com

Don’t look up now, but your phone may be about to injure you

July 31, 2016 07:03 PM

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