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Alex Smith: 'It's a great rivalry, but not if you’re on the other end' 2:56

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Chiefs coach Andy Reid: 'We've got to do better, starting with me'

Olympian John Carlos, who raised his fist in '68, talks to KC students 2:32

Olympian John Carlos, who raised his fist in '68, talks to KC students

Look at the overwhelmingly positive responses to #metoo, a hashtag for survivors of sexual abuse 1:15

Look at the overwhelmingly positive responses to #metoo, a hashtag for survivors of sexual abuse

Raiders, Chiefs leave the field after Oakland victory 2:21

Raiders, Chiefs leave the field after Oakland victory

Derrick Johnson: 'It's how you respond' 0:37

Derrick Johnson: 'It's how you respond'

Watch as a deer narrowly avoids collision with two cross-country runners 0:22

Watch as a deer narrowly avoids collision with two cross-country runners

Tourette's syndrome didn't stop this Royals player from being successful 1:59

Tourette's syndrome didn't stop this Royals player from being successful

Meet the teen candidates running for governor of Kansas 8:31

Meet the teen candidates running for governor of Kansas

Stepson of slain KCK Police Capt. Robert David Melton, prepares for boxing in Guns N’ Hoses charity event 2:35

Stepson of slain KCK Police Capt. Robert David Melton, prepares for boxing in Guns N’ Hoses charity event

  • Recovering from opioid addiction

    Rachelle Allen, 40, of Kansas City lost her home, her children and her career to a decade-long addiction to prescription pain medications. Like a growing number of people nationwide, Allen started taking opioid pain pills after surgery and found that she couldn't stop. After two run-ins with law enforcement, Allen has been rebuilding her life, working full-time in a downtown Kansas City restaurant, re-establishing relationships with her three children and attending therapy sessions at Samuel U. Rodgers Health Center. She has been in recovery for more than a year.

Rachelle Allen, 40, of Kansas City lost her home, her children and her career to a decade-long addiction to prescription pain medications. Like a growing number of people nationwide, Allen started taking opioid pain pills after surgery and found that she couldn't stop. After two run-ins with law enforcement, Allen has been rebuilding her life, working full-time in a downtown Kansas City restaurant, re-establishing relationships with her three children and attending therapy sessions at Samuel U. Rodgers Health Center. She has been in recovery for more than a year. Allison Long along@kcstar.com
Rachelle Allen, 40, of Kansas City lost her home, her children and her career to a decade-long addiction to prescription pain medications. Like a growing number of people nationwide, Allen started taking opioid pain pills after surgery and found that she couldn't stop. After two run-ins with law enforcement, Allen has been rebuilding her life, working full-time in a downtown Kansas City restaurant, re-establishing relationships with her three children and attending therapy sessions at Samuel U. Rodgers Health Center. She has been in recovery for more than a year. Allison Long along@kcstar.com

Prescription pills, addiction ‘hell’: Rachelle Allen’s story of opioid abuse offers look inside U.S. epidemic

February 27, 2016 4:32 PM

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Alex Smith: 'It's a great rivalry, but not if you’re on the other end' 2:56

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Chiefs coach Andy Reid: 'We've got to do better, starting with me' 2:24

Chiefs coach Andy Reid: 'We've got to do better, starting with me'

Olympian John Carlos, who raised his fist in '68, talks to KC students 2:32

Olympian John Carlos, who raised his fist in '68, talks to KC students

Look at the overwhelmingly positive responses to #metoo, a hashtag for survivors of sexual abuse 1:15

Look at the overwhelmingly positive responses to #metoo, a hashtag for survivors of sexual abuse

Raiders, Chiefs leave the field after Oakland victory 2:21

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Derrick Johnson: 'It's how you respond' 0:37

Derrick Johnson: 'It's how you respond'

Watch as a deer narrowly avoids collision with two cross-country runners 0:22

Watch as a deer narrowly avoids collision with two cross-country runners

Tourette's syndrome didn't stop this Royals player from being successful 1:59

Tourette's syndrome didn't stop this Royals player from being successful

Meet the teen candidates running for governor of Kansas 8:31

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  • First treatment that genetically modifies patients’ cells to destroy cancer approved by FDA

    T-cells are one of immune system’s key soldiers, targeting infected or abnormal cells but cancer can block those defenses. Now scientists are genetically modifying patients own cells to make them smarter and tougher at seeking out and destroying cancer. One version is called CAR-T cell therapy, T-cells customized to zero in on a patients specific kind of cancer.