Since Aug. 15, Children’s Mercy Hospital has tested for enterovirus D68 in 646 patients with serious respiratory complaints. In 498 of the cases, the tests were positive, indicating that the children were infected with an enterovirus or a rhinovirus. “We do not truly know the scope of this outbreak yet, but our suspicion is 70 to 90 percent are enterovirus 68,” said Mary Anne Jackson, the chief of infectious diseases at the Kansas City hospital.
Since Aug. 15, Children’s Mercy Hospital has tested for enterovirus D68 in 646 patients with serious respiratory complaints. In 498 of the cases, the tests were positive, indicating that the children were infected with an enterovirus or a rhinovirus. “We do not truly know the scope of this outbreak yet, but our suspicion is 70 to 90 percent are enterovirus 68,” said Mary Anne Jackson, the chief of infectious diseases at the Kansas City hospital. File photo by JOHN SLEEZER The Kansas City Star
Since Aug. 15, Children’s Mercy Hospital has tested for enterovirus D68 in 646 patients with serious respiratory complaints. In 498 of the cases, the tests were positive, indicating that the children were infected with an enterovirus or a rhinovirus. “We do not truly know the scope of this outbreak yet, but our suspicion is 70 to 90 percent are enterovirus 68,” said Mary Anne Jackson, the chief of infectious diseases at the Kansas City hospital. File photo by JOHN SLEEZER The Kansas City Star

Respiratory virus first reported in KC kids now suspected in 12 states

September 08, 2014 6:38 PM

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