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  • Student talks about contracting, and fighting, tuberculosis

    Zee Pinkerton generated fear in Olathe Northwest High School two years ago when he contracted active tuberculosis and spread the latent form of the disease to 50 classmates. He’s become an advocate against tuberculosis and told his story for the first time at his Olathe home.

Zee Pinkerton generated fear in Olathe Northwest High School two years ago when he contracted active tuberculosis and spread the latent form of the disease to 50 classmates. He’s become an advocate against tuberculosis and told his story for the first time at his Olathe home. Allison Long and Andy Marso The Kansas City Star
Zee Pinkerton generated fear in Olathe Northwest High School two years ago when he contracted active tuberculosis and spread the latent form of the disease to 50 classmates. He’s become an advocate against tuberculosis and told his story for the first time at his Olathe home. Allison Long and Andy Marso The Kansas City Star

He survived tuberculosis as a senior at Olathe Northwest, and now he wants to keep others from getting it

June 05, 2017 07:00 AM

UPDATED June 05, 2017 02:23 PM

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  • First treatment that genetically modifies patients’ cells to destroy cancer approved by FDA

    T-cells are one of immune system’s key soldiers, targeting infected or abnormal cells but cancer can block those defenses. Now scientists are genetically modifying patients own cells to make them smarter and tougher at seeking out and destroying cancer. One version is called CAR-T cell therapy, T-cells customized to zero in on a patients specific kind of cancer.