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How we made the shot: Plaza lighting ceremony 2:16

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Missouri Tigers basketball team warms up before Iowa State game

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Is Jolie Justus the KC mayor's pick for his replacement?

Narrow win over Emporia State is a wake-up call for Mizzou 7:01

Narrow win over Emporia State is a wake-up call for Mizzou

Watch: Burglar breaks out window at Waldo Jewelers 0:17

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Ax throwing club in the West Bottoms 0:39

Ax throwing club in the West Bottoms

Apartment building boom takes off in JoCo 3:23

Apartment building boom takes off in JoCo

Royals catcher Salvador Perez takes BP, Joakim Soria goes on disabled list 1:28

Royals catcher Salvador Perez takes BP, Joakim Soria goes on disabled list

Washington State coach Mike Leach talks about his favorite mascots 1:58

Washington State coach Mike Leach talks about his favorite mascots

J’Mon Moore: Purdue loss was the low point for Mizzou 2:31

J’Mon Moore: Purdue loss was the low point for Mizzou

  • Pediatric surgeon repairs 38-year-old's sunken chest

    Pediatric and fetal surgeon Corey Iqbal recently operated on Dustin Lurvey, 38, of Olathe for pectus excavatum or sunken chest. In the operation he implanted a metal bar that will be left in place for 2 to 3 years, expanding Lurvey's chest. Iqbal practices at the Overland Park Regional Medical Center.

Pediatric and fetal surgeon Corey Iqbal recently operated on Dustin Lurvey, 38, of Olathe for pectus excavatum or sunken chest. In the operation he implanted a metal bar that will be left in place for 2 to 3 years, expanding Lurvey's chest. Iqbal practices at the Overland Park Regional Medical Center. Keith Myers The Kansas City Star
Pediatric and fetal surgeon Corey Iqbal recently operated on Dustin Lurvey, 38, of Olathe for pectus excavatum or sunken chest. In the operation he implanted a metal bar that will be left in place for 2 to 3 years, expanding Lurvey's chest. Iqbal practices at the Overland Park Regional Medical Center. Keith Myers The Kansas City Star

Olathe man’s surgery to fix sunken chest could open new market for pediatric surgeon

April 11, 2017 07:00 AM

UPDATED April 11, 2017 07:12 AM

More Videos

How we made the shot: Plaza lighting ceremony 2:16

How we made the shot: Plaza lighting ceremony

Missouri Tigers basketball team warms up before Iowa State game 0:55

Missouri Tigers basketball team warms up before Iowa State game

Is Jolie Justus the KC mayor's pick for his replacement? 1:47

Is Jolie Justus the KC mayor's pick for his replacement?

Narrow win over Emporia State is a wake-up call for Mizzou 7:01

Narrow win over Emporia State is a wake-up call for Mizzou

Watch: Burglar breaks out window at Waldo Jewelers 0:17

Watch: Burglar breaks out window at Waldo Jewelers

Ax throwing club in the West Bottoms 0:39

Ax throwing club in the West Bottoms

Apartment building boom takes off in JoCo 3:23

Apartment building boom takes off in JoCo

Royals catcher Salvador Perez takes BP, Joakim Soria goes on disabled list 1:28

Royals catcher Salvador Perez takes BP, Joakim Soria goes on disabled list

Washington State coach Mike Leach talks about his favorite mascots 1:58

Washington State coach Mike Leach talks about his favorite mascots

J’Mon Moore: Purdue loss was the low point for Mizzou 2:31

J’Mon Moore: Purdue loss was the low point for Mizzou

  • First treatment that genetically modifies patients’ cells to destroy cancer approved by FDA

    T-cells are one of immune system’s key soldiers, targeting infected or abnormal cells but cancer can block those defenses. Now scientists are genetically modifying patients own cells to make them smarter and tougher at seeking out and destroying cancer. One version is called CAR-T cell therapy, T-cells customized to zero in on a patients specific kind of cancer.