More Videos

Chiefs head coach Andy Reid on winning in LA and his team's protests 3:30

Chiefs head coach Andy Reid on winning in LA and his team's protests

Some Chiefs players participate in protest before game against Chargers 1:52

Some Chiefs players participate in protest before game against Chargers

More NFL players sit, take a knee following Trump criticism 1:44

More NFL players sit, take a knee following Trump criticism

Chiefs leave the field after 24-10 victory over Chargers 2:00

Chiefs leave the field after 24-10 victory over Chargers

Youth 4 Change advocate for awareness of teen homeless 1:49

Youth 4 Change advocate for awareness of teen homeless

Dontari Poe on TD pass: 'I was in Coach Reid's ear, like a true offensive player' 0:47

Dontari Poe on TD pass: 'I was in Coach Reid's ear, like a true offensive player'

Trump says any NFL player who sits during anthem is 'son of a bitch' and should be fired 0:51

Trump says any NFL player who sits during anthem is 'son of a bitch' and should be fired

American flag fills Arrowhead Stadium field for National Anthem 0:45

American flag fills Arrowhead Stadium field for National Anthem

Royals' Whit Merrifield visits kids at Ronald McDonald House 0:34

Royals' Whit Merrifield visits kids at Ronald McDonald House

'I'm not surprised by the gesture,' Lebanon coach says of Justin Britt 1:46

'I'm not surprised by the gesture,' Lebanon coach says of Justin Britt

  • Key to tribe's healthy hearts is hard work

    A team of researchers collected cardio scan data on more than 700 people of the Tsimane tribe in remote Bolivia to gain insights into whether life with very few traditional coronary risk factors leads to more or less coronary heart disease. A principal researcher, Randall Thompson of St. Luke's Mid America Heart institute, describes the study and their findings. Photos and images courtesy of Randall Thompson, Adam Thompson, Ben Trumble and Mike Gurven.

A team of researchers collected cardio scan data on more than 700 people of the Tsimane tribe in remote Bolivia to gain insights into whether life with very few traditional coronary risk factors leads to more or less coronary heart disease. A principal researcher, Randall Thompson of St. Luke's Mid America Heart institute, describes the study and their findings. Photos and images courtesy of Randall Thompson, Adam Thompson, Ben Trumble and Mike Gurven. Jill Toyoshiba, with reporting by Donna McGuire The Kansas City Star
A team of researchers collected cardio scan data on more than 700 people of the Tsimane tribe in remote Bolivia to gain insights into whether life with very few traditional coronary risk factors leads to more or less coronary heart disease. A principal researcher, Randall Thompson of St. Luke's Mid America Heart institute, describes the study and their findings. Photos and images courtesy of Randall Thompson, Adam Thompson, Ben Trumble and Mike Gurven. Jill Toyoshiba, with reporting by Donna McGuire The Kansas City Star

World’s healthiest hearts beat in tribe in Amazon jungle, Kansas City researchers find

March 17, 2017 11:15 AM