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  • Key to tribe's healthy hearts is hard work

    A team of researchers collected cardio scan data on more than 700 people of the Tsimane tribe in remote Bolivia to gain insights into whether life with very few traditional coronary risk factors leads to more or less coronary heart disease. A principal researcher, Randall Thompson of St. Luke's Mid America Heart institute, describes the study and their findings. Photos and images courtesy of Randall Thompson, Adam Thompson, Ben Trumble and Mike Gurven.

A team of researchers collected cardio scan data on more than 700 people of the Tsimane tribe in remote Bolivia to gain insights into whether life with very few traditional coronary risk factors leads to more or less coronary heart disease. A principal researcher, Randall Thompson of St. Luke's Mid America Heart institute, describes the study and their findings. Photos and images courtesy of Randall Thompson, Adam Thompson, Ben Trumble and Mike Gurven. Jill Toyoshiba, with reporting by Donna McGuire The Kansas City Star
A team of researchers collected cardio scan data on more than 700 people of the Tsimane tribe in remote Bolivia to gain insights into whether life with very few traditional coronary risk factors leads to more or less coronary heart disease. A principal researcher, Randall Thompson of St. Luke's Mid America Heart institute, describes the study and their findings. Photos and images courtesy of Randall Thompson, Adam Thompson, Ben Trumble and Mike Gurven. Jill Toyoshiba, with reporting by Donna McGuire The Kansas City Star

World’s healthiest hearts beat in tribe in Amazon jungle, Kansas City researchers find

March 17, 2017 11:15 AM

UPDATED March 17, 2017 04:32 PM

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  • First treatment that genetically modifies patients’ cells to destroy cancer approved by FDA

    T-cells are one of immune system’s key soldiers, targeting infected or abnormal cells but cancer can block those defenses. Now scientists are genetically modifying patients own cells to make them smarter and tougher at seeking out and destroying cancer. One version is called CAR-T cell therapy, T-cells customized to zero in on a patients specific kind of cancer.