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KU's Hasan Defense discusses his late hit on Baker Mayfield 1:38

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Joe Dineen explains why KU's captains didn't shake Baker Mayfield's hand after the coin toss 3:40

Joe Dineen explains why KU's captains didn't shake Baker Mayfield's hand after the coin toss

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How secrecy in Kansas is hurting its citizens 2:37

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David Beaty on his players not shaking Baker Mayfield's hand during coin-toss ceremony 1:52

David Beaty on his players not shaking Baker Mayfield's hand during coin-toss ceremony

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National adoption day-ecstatic mother overjoyed by her son's adoption

Leeann Tweeden accepts Senator Franken's apology, recounts moment of sexual assault 1:36

Leeann Tweeden accepts Senator Franken's apology, recounts moment of sexual assault

Barry Odom: sixth win was a 'barrier' to break through 9:21

Barry Odom: sixth win was a "barrier" to break through

Brandon Lee: MU teammates say he’s a running back after his pick-six 2:38

Brandon Lee: MU teammates say he’s a running back after his pick-six

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  • Injury, chronic pain, lead to life in kilt for Leawood man

    "I look completely normal," said Ken Babb of Leawood, a former executive engineer at IBM, who suffers from a chronic and painful nerve condition called complex regional pain syndrome or CRPS. Babb does everything he can to keep anything, even a pair of trousers, from touching his leg. He explains that he's been wearing a kilt since receiving it from his wife as a birthday gift in 2015.

"I look completely normal," said Ken Babb of Leawood, a former executive engineer at IBM, who suffers from a chronic and painful nerve condition called complex regional pain syndrome or CRPS. Babb does everything he can to keep anything, even a pair of trousers, from touching his leg. He explains that he's been wearing a kilt since receiving it from his wife as a birthday gift in 2015. Tammy Ljungblad and Eric Adler The Kansas City Star
"I look completely normal," said Ken Babb of Leawood, a former executive engineer at IBM, who suffers from a chronic and painful nerve condition called complex regional pain syndrome or CRPS. Babb does everything he can to keep anything, even a pair of trousers, from touching his leg. He explains that he's been wearing a kilt since receiving it from his wife as a birthday gift in 2015. Tammy Ljungblad and Eric Adler The Kansas City Star

You see a man in a kilt. You don’t see his searing pain

March 01, 2017 03:37 PM

UPDATED March 01, 2017 05:07 PM

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KU's Hasan Defense discusses his late hit on Baker Mayfield 1:38

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Joe Dineen explains why KU's captains didn't shake Baker Mayfield's hand after the coin toss 3:40

Joe Dineen explains why KU's captains didn't shake Baker Mayfield's hand after the coin toss

'We still care': Families of homicide victims surprised with Thanksgiving baskets 0:54

'We still care': Families of homicide victims surprised with Thanksgiving baskets

How secrecy in Kansas is hurting its citizens 2:37

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David Beaty on his players not shaking Baker Mayfield's hand during coin-toss ceremony

National adoption day-ecstatic mother overjoyed by her son's adoption 1:19

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Leeann Tweeden accepts Senator Franken's apology, recounts moment of sexual assault 1:36

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Barry Odom: sixth win was a 'barrier' to break through 9:21

Barry Odom: sixth win was a "barrier" to break through

Brandon Lee: MU teammates say he’s a running back after his pick-six 2:38

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  • First treatment that genetically modifies patients’ cells to destroy cancer approved by FDA

    T-cells are one of immune system’s key soldiers, targeting infected or abnormal cells but cancer can block those defenses. Now scientists are genetically modifying patients own cells to make them smarter and tougher at seeking out and destroying cancer. One version is called CAR-T cell therapy, T-cells customized to zero in on a patients specific kind of cancer.