Cancer survivor Karla Boatright of Neosho, Mo., underwent several months of chemotherapy, then had surgery in June 2013. “You shed a lot of tears the first couple days,” Boatright says, “but then you put your game face on.” With her is husband Bruce.
Cancer survivor Karla Boatright of Neosho, Mo., underwent several months of chemotherapy, then had surgery in June 2013. “You shed a lot of tears the first couple days,” Boatright says, “but then you put your game face on.” With her is husband Bruce. Keith Myers The Kansas City Star
Cancer survivor Karla Boatright of Neosho, Mo., underwent several months of chemotherapy, then had surgery in June 2013. “You shed a lot of tears the first couple days,” Boatright says, “but then you put your game face on.” With her is husband Bruce. Keith Myers The Kansas City Star

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