Jason Ward walked toward his car after his morning part-time work at the Metro Lutheran Ministry Food Pantry in Kansas City. Ward, who is 7 feet tall, was diagnosed nine years ago at age 30 with Camurati-Engelmann disease, a rare bone disease that fewer than 200 people worldwide have. He is constantly in pain.
Jason Ward walked toward his car after his morning part-time work at the Metro Lutheran Ministry Food Pantry in Kansas City. Ward, who is 7 feet tall, was diagnosed nine years ago at age 30 with Camurati-Engelmann disease, a rare bone disease that fewer than 200 people worldwide have. He is constantly in pain. David Eulitt The Kansas City Star
Jason Ward walked toward his car after his morning part-time work at the Metro Lutheran Ministry Food Pantry in Kansas City. Ward, who is 7 feet tall, was diagnosed nine years ago at age 30 with Camurati-Engelmann disease, a rare bone disease that fewer than 200 people worldwide have. He is constantly in pain. David Eulitt The Kansas City Star

Unspeakable pain: As many suffer in silence, a local initiative seeks to lift the shadows

August 09, 2014 05:15 PM

UPDATED August 10, 2014 09:12 AM

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