Kate Alcott’s “The Hollywood Daughter” is at first loaded with nostalgia, and Los Angeles of the 1940s and 1950s feels simple and elegant. But the novel slowly unravels this idealistic image to show the danger of conformity and the overwhelming pressure to do what is expected in a culture where aberration is not tolerated.
Kate Alcott’s “The Hollywood Daughter” is at first loaded with nostalgia, and Los Angeles of the 1940s and 1950s feels simple and elegant. But the novel slowly unravels this idealistic image to show the danger of conformity and the overwhelming pressure to do what is expected in a culture where aberration is not tolerated.
Kate Alcott’s “The Hollywood Daughter” is at first loaded with nostalgia, and Los Angeles of the 1940s and 1950s feels simple and elegant. But the novel slowly unravels this idealistic image to show the danger of conformity and the overwhelming pressure to do what is expected in a culture where aberration is not tolerated.

Ingrid Bergman, communism mingle in alluring ‘The Hollywood Daughter’

April 01, 2017 07:06 AM