Sprint is closing Overland Park call center, cutting about 200 jobs

Call centers in Sacramento, Calif., and Elmsford, N.Y., also are closing. A television station in Florida reported a fourth call center in Orlando, Fla., will lay off about 400 people. And in Fort Worth, Texas, according to the newspaper there, 450 jobs are being cut at that city’s call center. Overall, the paper reported, Sprint is cutting 1,550 customer service jobs, citing greater efficiencies.

Sprint announces One Up, its one-year upgrade plan

The plan follows similar programs at the three other national wireless companies to allow customers a new phone each year. One Up, like plans at other carriers, also includes an installment payment feature for the new devices. Sprint said One Up spreads the cost of the new phone over 24 monthly payments, with the size of the final payment varying in some cases.

SoftBank-Sprint deal reportedly has national security approval

The Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. and the two companies reached an security agreement following a thorough review of the proposed transaction, according to a person familiar with the matter. The agreement, which could be announced any time, would remove a hurdle to the deal to give Tokyo-based SoftBank control of Sprint.

Sprint suitor addresses cybersecurity concerns

SoftBank Corp. has agreed to appoint a U.S. government-approved “security director” to the wireless phone company’s board to address national security concerns. It made the unusual commitment to several federal agencies, including the U.S. Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security, as it presses for federal approval of its agreement to buy 70 percent of Sprint for $20.1 billion.

Clearwire draws $80 million more in financing from Sprint

The financing, part of a prearranged agreement with Overland Park-based Sprint, can be exchanged for Clearwire stock at $1.50 a share under certain conditions. The move gives Sprint a way to tighten its grip on Clearwire as a rival suitor, Dish Network Corp. seeks to wrest control of the wireless Internet company’s valuable airwaves – perhaps by acquiring Sprint itself

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