Actress Connie Stevens wants to make people laugh — because they need it

Connie Stevens — who is in town to star in the New Theatre Restaurant production of “Miracle on South Division Street” — was the classic studio starlet. She made dumb TV shows (“Hawaiian Eye”) and movies we now regard as camp (“Parrish,” “Susan Slade”). She made pop records. As time went by, she played Vegas. But as is often the case with celebrities we think we know, a serious human being is at work behind the superficial imagery.

Ink Bar Guide

The definitive guide to your favorite watering holes, from packed pubs to under-the-radar dives.

The Star's Restaurant Guide

Search The Star's restaurant dining guide by type of cuisine, location, vegetarian options and more, then link with the restaurant's website to check out complete menus.

Your $5 Lunch Guide

Browse more than 50 local spots that dish up delicious fare for $5 or less.

Stargazing

Restaurants

In midtown, three new spots for cheap thrills

In one weekend, The Star’s Jeneé Osterheldt checked out the late-night drinks at Drunken Worm, 1405 W. 39th St., the light lunch at iPho Tower, 3623 Broadway, and the desserts at Baked in Kansas City, 706 Westport Road, and didn’t break the bank.

Music

Back to Rockville

Movies

‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’ tops box office for third week

Captain America continues to vanquish box office foes, triumphing in ticket sales for the third consecutive week and dominating over megastar Johnny Depp's new movie. "Captain America: The Winter Soldier" added another $26 million to its coffers, according to studio estimates Sunday, while Depp's sci-fi thriller, "Transcendence," opened in fourth place with $11 million.

New vampire movie ‘Only Lovers Left Alive' is also a tribute to the lute

“Only Lovers Left Alive,” which is scheduled to open in Kansas City on May 9, has a soundtrack saturated with refined esoterica, featuring everything from art-damaged rockabilly to ecstatic Arabic pop — and a mother lode of lute, the Renaissance and baroque instruments beloved of Hiddleston’s character, a guitar player and instrument collector.

Television

Theater

Actress Connie Stevens wants to make people laugh — because they need it

Connie Stevens — who is in town to star in the New Theatre Restaurant production of “Miracle on South Division Street” — was the classic studio starlet. She made dumb TV shows (“Hawaiian Eye”) and movies we now regard as camp (“Parrish,” “Susan Slade”). She made pop records. As time went by, she played Vegas. But as is often the case with celebrities we think we know, a serious human being is at work behind the superficial imagery.

MET’s ‘Steel Magnolias’ blends laughter, tears and friendship

The reason Robert Harling’s “Steel Magnolias” seems destined to be produced in perpetuity is its remarkable ability to generate belly laughs and involuntary tears in the course of two hours. The play isn’t exactly a farce. Neither is it a melodrama. And it’s not really a comedy of manners. But it has elements of all of the above.

Arts and books

Art and archaeology rewrite Arabia’s past in exhibit of recent excavations at Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

Stone tools made a million years ago. Colossal sculptures of ancient kings. A gold funerary mask and glove, sized for a young girl. These objects, recently excavated in Saudi Arabia, are rewriting the region’s history. Beginning Friday you can see them at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in the exhibit “Roads of Arabia: Archaeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.”