BILLY GRAHAM

Though a humble carpenter as a youth, Christ was always a king

Updated: 2014-02-26T01:04:49Z

By BILLY GRAHAM

Tribune Media Services

DEAR BILLY GRAHAM: This past Christmas, I got to thinking about what might have happened to Jesus while he was growing up. Does the Bible tell us? I’ve seen articles saying he went to places like Tibet or India to learn about philosophy and religion. Is there any truth to this? — D.G.

DEAR D.G.: No, there’s no truth to such stories. Not a word in the Bible gives any support for them, nor do any later works from the early centuries of Christianity. Articles like you read may sell magazines to people standing in the supermarket checkout line, but they have no historical basis.

The Bible doesn’t give us many details about Jesus’ early life because its purpose is to tell us about his public ministry, including his death and resurrection.

It seems clear, however, that Jesus spent most of his life in the little town of Nazareth, working in his father’s carpentry shop (although Joseph wasn’t actually his father, since Jesus was born of the Virgin Mary and God). “Isn’t this the carpenter?” some of his enemies said scornfully (Mark 6:3).

But Jesus was more than a carpenter. Jesus (the Bible tells us) was God in human flesh — fully man, but also fully God. And that’s why he didn’t need to sort through the world’s philosophies to decide what he’d believe; he was the embodiment of all truth. The Bible says that in him “are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge” (Colossians 2:3).

Why is this important? It means that Jesus is worthy of your faith. More than that, it means he is worthy of your commitment — both now, and for all eternity. Don’t choose the wrong road, but give your life to Jesus, who alone is “the way and the truth and the life” (John 14:6).

© Tribune Media Services 2/26

Deal Saver Subscribe today!

Comments

The Kansas City Star is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Kansas City Star uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here