Breaking News

U.S. House marks anniversary of pro-slavery Kansas constitution’s rejection

Updated: 2014-02-10T13:10:07Z

— Three Kansas lawmakers have introduced a resolution in the U.S. House marking the 155th anniversary of the rejection of a document that would have made Kansas a slave state.

The Lecompton Constitution, named for the territorial capital where it was written, was narrowly defeated by the U.S. House in February 1858, sending leaders back to work on a new document. A constitution prohibiting the institution of slavery in Kansas was written in Wyandotte County and ultimately accepted by Congress.

Kansas became the 34th state to join the Union on Jan. 29, 1861.

The resolution was offered by Republican Reps. Lynn Jenkins, Kevin Yoder and Mike Pompeo. It notes the importance of Lecompton, which has been called “the place where slavery began to die.”

| The Associated Press

Deal Saver Subscribe today!

Comments

The Kansas City Star is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Kansas City Star uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here