Yael T. Abouhalkah

Social media are helping kill Daisy Coleman

Updated: 2014-01-09T01:31:33Z

By Yael T. Abouhalkah

The Kansas City Star

It’s trite but sure looks true: Social media are helping to kill Daisy Coleman.

More specifically, the creeps on social media — especially Facebook — appear to have had a profound effect on the Missouri teenager.

And yes, it’s abundantly true that the alleged sexual assault of Coleman in 2012 is the real cause of her current problems, the real reason she seems to have become the target of some hatred on social media.

It would be better for all if Daisy and Melinda, her mom, were able to completely shut out social media, just to make the temptation go away to pay any attention to it at all.

As The Star reported this week, Coleman was recovering from a suicide attempt.

Robin Bourland, a longtime acquaintance of the Coleman family, said Coleman was being treated at a Kansas City hospital after ingesting pills Sunday evening.

The Star reported: “According to Bourland, the incident stemmed from online harassment that Daisy Coleman, 16, received after attending a party over the weekend. A disparaging Facebook post generated additional harsh attacks, said Bourland, and “it just escalated from there.’”

Just Google “Daisy Coleman” or get on Twitter and look for certain accounts and you can get linked to some vile stuff being said about the 16-year-old.

It’s the ugly, vicious side of social media.

It’s the side we all know exists and that, for many people, can be ignored.

But a teenager who has been through a horrible, horrible event in her life apparently is unable to pull the plug on social media.

So in this case the victim is unfairly having to bear the blame for simply trying to get on with her life. So sad.

To reach Yael T. Abouhalkah, call 816-234-4887 or send email to abouhalkah@kcstar.com. Follow him at Twitter.com/YaelTAbouhalkah.

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