The Buzz

BuzzChatter Thursday: Kinder says votes are there for right-to-work in Missouri

Updated: 2013-12-25T23:20:30Z

By STEVE KRASKE

The Kansas City Star

We scrambled and scrounged for this morning’s batch:

• “Six of our eight neighboring states are right-to-work states. When I was growing up in southeast Missouri, Tennessee was not ahead of Missouri in any economic indicator. They are today.” — Missouri Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder on the need for right-to-work legislation in his state.

Kinder is convinced the votes are there in the General Assembly to pass right-to-work in Missouri in 2014. If it does pass, the issue would go to the voters, and a massive campaign would be waged by both sides.

• “This sound fiscal management allows me to release these funds that can be put to use in several state programs and make long-term capital improvements.” — Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon on his release of more than $40 million in withheld budget funds for a series of projects.

Nixon’s release of the money this week includes $18 million for capital improvements for the Statehouse, which will be used to seal and waterproof the south side of the historic building. Nixon said the work “will improve the overall appearance, structural stability and water-shedding capacity of the building.” House Speaker Tim Jones, a Republican, chided Nixon, saying the money never had to be withheld in the first place.

• “What happens in Indiana is critical.” — Brian Brown, president of the National Organization for Marriage, which opposes same-sex marriage, on what will happen in the generally conservative state in the weeks to come. Lawmakers are soon expected to call for a second vote needed to put a same-sex marriage ban before voters in the fall elections.

Indiana now looms as a national test case on whether the state will impose new limits on same-sex marriage, an issue that is evolving rapidly across the country.

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