Letters to the Editor

Bonus for coach, Obamacare, charitable giving

Updated: 2013-12-07T05:52:43Z

Bonus for coach

I read with interest/disgust the Dec. 4 article, “Pinkel cashing in with bonuses,” describing the bonus money that coach Gary Pinkel has already made because of the University of Missouri’s successful football season.

Mr. Pinkel, whose base salary is $2.6 million annually, has qualified for $200,000 bonus money while nine assistant coaches and three unspecified others have qualified for $5,000 apiece.

This strikes me as being as unfair as Michael Duke’s recent retirement as CEO of Wal-Mart.

The poor guy is being asked to eke out a living on a $113-million IRA, which is 6,182 times greater than the average Wal-Mart employee’s IRA.

I don’t know anything about coach Pinkel.

Maybe he is a generous guy who will share some of his bounty with his assistants and other people who are part of the football program.

It looks like he can afford it.

Roland P. Pera

Lenexa

Radical ideologues

It is time the American voter took some responsibility for the mess in Washington, D.C. I think this is an opportunity for voters to see what kind of government they are voting for.

If they voted for a conservative, tea party Republican and are planning to vote for a member of this party in the next election, they are getting exactly the kind of government they are voting for.

Whatever issue drives them to vote for the tea party, it is time to ask, is my issue important enough to risk losing our democratic form of government?

With the shutdown we experienced, tea party Republicans have shown themselves to be radical ideologues who have no respect for our form of government.

Janelle Ramsburg

Prairie Village

Opposing Obamacare

Some social-welfare programs have existed since the 1930s, and there are many pros and cons about these programs.

All programs except Obamacare have one thing in common. The costs are hidden from the citizen.

The funds to pay for these programs either are deducted from people’s paychecks or are taken from taxes paid by citizens and businesses.

The citizen isn’t required to reach into his pocket and directly shell out money for these programs. The funds are taken from him before he ever receives them.

Now along comes Obamacare.

This is a program where the consumers, the bulk of the citizens, are required to pay through monthly premiums. The costs come directly from one’s pocket.

Now the consumer has awakened.

He now has a social-welfare program that has been thrust upon him without his approval, and the costs of this program are to be borne directly by him. In addition, he is forced to pay for items he either doesn’t want or need.

Is there any wonder why there is so much opposition to Obamacare?

John H. Brown Jr.

Independence

Sanchez column

In her Dec. 3 column, “A year after Sandy Hook, we’re still in denial,” Mary Sanchez opined that it was much too easy for the monster-who-will-not-be-named who killed the innocent children Dec. 14, 2012, at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., to get his rifle.

Perhaps a reminder is in order.

The monster murdered his mother to get it. I don’t consider that easy access.

Carl Smart

Independence

Push American-made

I am puzzled that we don’t have a buy-American campaign in this country.

I have come up with some sayings keying off the idea of makers and takers and job creators:

• Be a job creator. Buy American.

• Be a maker, not a taker. Demand and buy only American-made.

• Save American jobs. Buy American.

• Save Social Security. Buy American.

• Thank a vet. Buy American.

• Give yourself a Christmas present. Buy American.

The Congress and the president seem to be afraid to touch this buy-American idea as a way of solving our fiscal problems concerning jobs, Social Security, veterans’ benefits and the debt.

This is something we all can do at the grass-roots level, and we don’t have to elect someone or wait for someone to do it for us.

Arthur Basler

Lee’s Summit

Obama, U.S. king

Barack Obama has forgotten he was elected president of the United States and not king of the United States. While telling us we have to follow the law, he is deciding which parts of the law he will obey.

After pushing through the Affordable Care Act without any bipartisan support, after the Supreme Court stamped it legal by calling the fees a tax, after telling us we can keep our current insurance plans if we like them, after selling us all the benefits of the Affordable Care Act while ignoring the drawbacks, President Obama is now having to pay the piper.

He breaks the law by allowing big businesses a one-year exception.

He breaks the law by instructing the states to allow the issuance of policies that are in direct violation of the law.

He breaks the law by allowing small businesses a one-year exception.

He can only rationally perform these actions by declaring himself king.

It must be nice to be king.

William Gray

Overland Park

Done with the stars

Many television seasons ago, “Dancing with the Stars” debuted as a unique program of legitimate ballroom dancing, studded with star power, an excellent orchestra and talented Tom Bergeron at the helm.

It was a very enjoyable program of music and dance, appealing to the eye and the ear, tastefully executed and competently judged by professional dancers.

Sadly, “Dancing with the Stars” now looks and sounds as seamy and tawdry as anything you would see on MTV.

The skimpy costumes have gotten beyond good taste, and the frenzied pace of the music and dancing are laughable.

Some of the contestants seem less than sincere. The special effects destroy any semblance of legitimate dance, and then they bring in Cher, the Queen of Sleeze, as a judge.

That’s a new low for the show. Cher seemed embarrassed at her incompetence to judge the contestants.

I don’t know if Len Goodman, the senior judge, walked away for that week’s show on his own, but if the other judges have any backbone, they, too, will walk away.

They seem to really know their stuff, and they are sacrificing it all for this trash.

Will someone please bring back “Dancing with the Stars”?

Mary Pat Miller

Overland Park

Charitable giving

This is the time of year when we get slammed with letters from charities as the holidays approach.

Various charities provide needed services and funds to those in need. Without the help of charities and generous gifting, the world would be in much worse condition.

However, many charities give away only a very small percentage of the money they take in.

Some pay executives and founders enormous salaries with generous benefits.

I recommend that before you give, get on your computer and go to www.charitynavigator.org.

This organization rates charities and gives details that will help you make an educated decision regarding which charities to support.

There are other organizations that rate charities, but this one is my favorite.

You will note that many charities for veterans, as well as those proclaiming to help ill children, are especially suspect.

Take the time to do your gifting in a way that gets the maximum amount from your good will to those who need it.

Don’t be scammed in the name of good will.

Herman Kirkpatrick

Leawood

Strangers’ honesty

Recently, in my rush to leave, I accidentally dropped my purse in the parking lot of the midtown Costco store.

I am embarrassed to admit that the same thing happened years ago in a Wal-Mart parking lot.

However, both times my purse was returned to the store with all credit cards and cash enclosed.

Thank you, thank you whoever you are.

I believe the vast majority of Americans are honest and will do the right thing, and we all need to be reminded of the kindness of strangers.

Elaine O’Connor

Kansas City

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