Letters to the Editor

Middle-class pain, Neo-Nazis, KCI

Updated: 2013-11-12T00:05:46Z

Middle-class pain

This letter is to those who don’t buy the fact that the middle class is shrinking.

Unfortunately, in a country that for too long has had a love affair with cars and refuses to invest in a decent mass-transit system because too many scream “socialism,” the already strapped middle class has no choice but to have a car to get to work and get groceries, clothing and other things.

In a family such as ours that has one spouse traveling out of town every day, a decent car becomes imperative. People who live in affluent suburbs are not absolved from noticing the rest of the world around you.

I live in Lawrence. Why don’t non-believers do a little research on my town? Since my family has been here the last 14 years, our supposed “liberal” town has become a lot less so — two Wal-Marts, a ridiculous amount of apartments and a sharper line between the haves and have-nots.

Vicky Olson

Lawrence

Changed America

I am an 84-year-old female, born in 1929. I grew up with Herbert Hoover, Franklin Roosevelt, Harry Truman and all of the other presidents.

This is not the United States that I grew up in. I just pray I am long below the sod before we hear a platoon of hobnail boots coming down the street.

Katie Griffith

Independence

Competing rallies

I didn’t get out of my car to join the rally opposite the Jackson County Courthouse (11-10, A4, “Freedom of speech reigns”).

I was afraid of being arrested for disturbing the peace if I mimicked the goose step with a clenched fist and yelled “Heil Schickelgruber.” That was the monster’s family name.

The gathering at the Liberty Memorial was just a bunch preaching to the choir. At least there was a large gathering.

Marvin W. Goodman

Lenexa

Practical KCI

I am not completely up to date on where the debate stands on Kansas City International Airport. I do have a position that I think is practical.

Kansas City has a unique and practical airport. It’s not much to look at, but it’s user friendly.

The fact is the status quo does not require further involvement by government or special-interest groups, which by itself is a positive. We as a city are not being managed well, so let’s become functional before throwing money around to distract from the poor results the city continues to produce in many areas.

Let’s have the best-run airport with the best customer service of any airport anywhere before tackling unnecessary brick-and-mortar projects.

Lastly, terrorism will continue to be a concern. Because of the disbursement of people and buildings, the design of KCI gives us the safest airport in the country when it comes to not providing dense, soft targets.

It may not be as exciting to fix our current problems, but it would be a safer and more practical way forward.

Charles Davis

Leawood

New life for issue

The translational medicine initiative was thrashed (11-6, A1, “Tax for research soundly rejected”).

It deserved defeat. It also deserves new life.

“Translational medical research” doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue, but this proposal included important benefits that were lost in translation. I hope the proponents learned necessary lessons to restructure this worthy but ill-defined project.

A sales tax is not the best funding for this effort. Sales taxes are regressive, particularly in one of the poorest counties in the area. Asking one county to fund a regional project is not fair, wise or realistic.

Research tends to smack of elitism, even when it has broadly applicable results. I didn’t hear anybody effectively teaching translational medicine so we could understand its purpose, value and implications for individuals as well as for the greater good.

Teach us. Trust us.

A little hubris and some effective structure would have gone a long way.

Don’t give up folks — learn. It’s called translational funding.

Linda Brown

Leavenworth

Guns kill people

A gun is more likely to be used in a homicide, suicide, assault or accident than in an act of defense. When someone is murdered in the U.S., it is normally by someone the victim knew, and the perpetrator is armed with a gun.

So hunting and recreation aside, the common use for a gun is trying to kill someone you disagree with, and the uncommon application is defense.

Without gun registration and universal background checks, it is effectively legal for gun owners to arm violent career criminals and mentally ill spree killers.

The claim that we can’t police our gun owners or hold them responsible for their arsenals because it supposedly interferes with their ability to protect themselves from the violent criminals and mentally ill spree killers they arm is insane.

Theodore J. Sturgeon

Olathe

New party needed

If I were forming a new political party, it would be composed of political moderates.

They would be former Democrats run out by the extreme left wing and former Republicans run out by the extreme right wing.

Called it the Big Moderate Party because that is where most of the people are — between the two extremes.

Howard Flint

Kansas City

Obama as scholar

Somebody needs to tell some letter writers that President Barack Obama is a constitutional scholar. He already knows about the laws of the land.

Sometimes the intricacies of law and even the most obvious escape the uninformed.

Kathleen Elliott

Overland Park

Paying in blood

To the readers who think the wealthiest 1 percent pay for the wars, how many of the rich have kids in the military services risking their lives? My guess is less than 1 percent.

If they do have children in the service, I’m sure they are not on the front lines at risk.

The people paying the highest price for the wars have children injured and dying.

The military has been attracting the poor and less well off for a long time. So I ask, who pays more — the people spending money or the people spending the blood of their loved ones?

Tom Clarke

Overland Park

Spending controls

Confuse the debt ceiling issue with all the rhetoric you can. But simple math confirms that our government continually spends more than it takes in.

Our Congress was forced to raise the debt ceiling, and in doing so lawmakers continued to pass the buck to the next generation.

Spending controls must be in place.

Those rich Republicans understand wealth, and it doesn’t come by spending more than you make.

Kurt Suchomel

Lee’s Summit

Enemies in U.S.

There are enemies of America everywhere these days, and we’ve found one more dangerous to us than al-Qaida — the U. S. Congress.

As that wise philosopher Pogo exclaimed, “We have met the enemy and he is us,” because we elected them.

Carrol L. Fry

Maryville, Mo.

Tea party obstruction

It’s well known that the tea party hates our federal government.

But now it’s also obvious tea party members hate our Constitution, our democratic form of government and the legislative system that’s served us well for more than 220 years.

Since 1789, the way to change or create a law is to write a bill, pass it in both chambers and get the president to sign it.

Tea partiers were free to do that with Obamacare.

But they hate our legislative system of government so much that they wanted to blow it up, regardless of how much damage they inflicted on our country.

Astonishingly, all other Republicans toed the line in cowardly fashion, fully supporting these few extremists.

Thanks a lot, Reps. Kevin Yoder and Lynn Jenkins and Sens. Jerry Moran and Pat Roberts, for your help in hurting citizens all across this country and for making us a laughingstock around the world.

Talis Bergmanis

Fairway

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