Letters to the Editor

Obamacare, health care, reparations

Updated: 2013-09-14T04:19:26Z

Expand health care

Kansas still has the opportunity to increase access to health care for 240,000 low-income Kansans and to save taxpayer dollars.

By accepting federal aid already allocated for the state to increase access to health coverage through KanCare, Gov. Sam Brownback can reduce the number of low-income families who lack access to affordable health care.

This year in Kansas, an estimated 14,000 people will be diagnosed with cancer, and 5,400 will die of the disease. People without health coverage are more likely to be diagnosed with cancer at its later stages, when patients are less likely to survive and treatments are more costly. Kansas’ governor and lawmakers need to decide to accept federal dollars to increase access to KanCare. Further delays could result in the state losing significant funding that could improve the health of its most vulnerable communities and reduce health-care costs.

By giving more people access to doctors, we can avoid spending millions of dollars currently used to treat uninsured people in emergency rooms. It doesn’t make sense to turn down money that is available to help Kansans. Hard-working, low-income families need the security of quality health coverage to get lifesaving care when they need it.

Jim Miksch

Prairie Village

Wrong state action

After reading the Sept. 10 article, “License agency broke law,” I believe Missouri’s state policy is a major issue.

The state is unlawfully keeping databases of personal records. If for some reason the Missouri Department of Revenue’s system were to be breached, a large number of Missourians would be easy targets for identity theft.

It is even more disturbing that the public was not aware of this. The state was allowing this to go on behind our backs, and it is an infringement of our rights.

Overall, this is a simply ridiculous and unnecessary policy that should never have been implemented. I am glad to know it will no longer continue.

Anthony Carollo

Lee’s Summit

Obamacare failures

When Obamacare was enacted in 2010, the Democratic Congress and the Obama administration obviously did not give themselves time to think this legislation through.

They threw together a bill of thousands of pages that few, if any, legislators had time to read, let alone understand, before voting on it. Now it becomes apparent that not all in it is good.

Employers are reducing hours or not hiring because the financial burdens of this plan are too complicated and costly. The Internal Revenue Service has demonstrated that it is not capable or trustworthy to be in charge of health care.

Why couldn’t they take the time and get it right in the first place? Politics. Lawmakers wanted to get the bill passed before the 2010 midterm elections.

Why are they now delaying implementation of a big part of it? Politics. They don’t want this to be a big issue in the 2014 elections.

Too bad they didn’t put politics aside in the first place, take the time to develop a health-care plan that worked properly and get bipartisan support.

Terry Isenberg

Lenexa

Reparations overdue

I think it is great that these ex-braceros are trying to receive reparations for themselves and their families because they deserve it after all the work they have done (9-8, A12, “Mexican workers demand pledged payment”).

The government has promised many reparations for several types of people and has often failed to come through on promises. The government has done so much wrong to so many people. Most have given up any hope of compensation.

It is good to see people stand up for something they believe in. I hope the many braceros and their families receive the compensation they deserve.

Nelson Peterson

Kansas City

Go slow at KCI

I was with a commercial bus company, delivering and picking up passengers from Kansas City International Airport. There is a 15 mph speed limit in the terminal areas. I dropped off a passenger Sept. 10 at Terminal B. She took her suitcase and crossed the inside lane to the terminal.

A woman who was in the process of bringing a male passenger to the airport was driving on the inside lane, clearly exceeding the posted speed limit, and almost hit my passenger. I yelled at the driver to slow down, and the male passenger cursed me.

I am making an appeal to the public to observe the posted speed limit at KCI. No one’s life or well-being is worth speeding through the terminal areas because you are late for your flight.

Ron Habernal

Liberty

‘Dream’ unfulfilled

I am a young, black, male student. I was on my way home from my friend’s house in Lee’s Summit when all of a sudden I saw red flashing lights behind me. Instinctively, I pulled over to yield to the police officer.

To my surprise, the police car did not proceed past me. Instead, it pulled to the side of the road behind me.

My heart started to throb. I didn’t know what I did wrong. I was positive that I was going the speed limit.

A police officer came to my window and asked me what I was doing “around here,” as if I did not belong.

I have lived in Lee’s Summit all of my life and was just on my way home, which was two miles away. I had never been racially profiled until that night.

At first I felt anger and then humiliation and then sadness. After I cooled off, I began to think about race relations in America.

I thought about what Martin Luther King III said during the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, how “the dream” has not yet been realized, and about Colin Powell’s conversation on what the enduring effect of the George Zimmerman trial might be — if any.

We must keep “the dream” alive and continue to work toward better race relations, especially in the Kansas City area. We cannot continue to allow other people to define our reality.

Your life is what you make of it.

Alex Fanning

Lee’s Summit

Hot tiger art

I just want to thank the people who admired our pictures in Westport at the recent art fair. In fact, some of you liked them so much that you neglected to pay for them. It is sad that you felt compelled to steal mostly the tigers, so we suspect a sports connection. Fortunately, we included our business cards with each item.

When you are bragging about your five-finger discount, please be so kind as to give credit to the artists, along with a recommendation. We will consider it free advertising.

Of course, I doubt that anyone who would steal so brazenly has much of a conscience.

D. Jeanine Wilson

Raymore

Benghazi unresolved

One year after the terrorist attack in Benghazi, surviving family members are no closer to the truth than when President Barack Obama and then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton stood over the four coffins and promised to jail the maker of an offensive video as a matter of national honor.

He’s the only one who has been arrested. No one else has been captured or tried; no responsible American government official has been fired or even suspended without pay.

The investigations are cover-ups and farces. The surviving Americans, including the severely wounded, are still hidden and completely hushed up.

They and their families may be under threat from our government if they speak to the media or to Congress. Lies, cover-ups and scandals.

Is this the land of the free and home of the brave? Is this what we elect our lawmakers and officials to stand for?

Is this what you want from American government? Is this self-government by we, the people?

What have they done with the free nation your fathers and grandfathers fought, bled and died to give us?

Ray Parker

Overland Park

Angels offer aid

I wish to thank all of the people who helped me get on my feet after my fall on Sept. 5 outside of the Eastglen 16 Theatres. There were no broken bones, just a lot of black and blue areas.

I give a special thank you to the lady driving past the theater who stopped and came over to help me. There are a lot of great people in this community.

God bless and thank you all.

John Sakmar

Lee’s Summit

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