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Federal human trafficking prosecutor in Kansas City will join Husch Blackwell

Updated: 2013-09-03T20:38:57Z

Federal prosecutor is joining Husch

Cynthia Cordes, the lead federal human trafficking prosecutor in Kansas City, soon will leave the U.S. attorney’s office to join a private law firm.

At the end of September, she will join former Missouri House speaker Catherine Hanaway and four other lawyers on Husch Blackwell’s government compliance and investigations team.

Hanaway once was U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Missouri.

Cordes, who will work in the law firm’s Kansas City office, prosecuted dozens of trafficking cases during her years with the federal prosecutor’s office, including those of several men who admitted answering decoy Internet postings that advertised young girls for sex. After joining the office in 2004, Cordes prosecuted more human and sex trafficking cases than any other assistant U.S. attorney in the country.

Sprint adds director

Sprint Corp. has added the head of the National Math + Science Initiative to its board of directors following July’s investment by SoftBank Corp.

Sara Martinez Tucker is chief executive of the initiative, which has programs in science, technology, engineering and math. It focuses on changing education in the United States.

Tucker, 56, had been in the U.S. Department of Education as undersecretary of education and had been president of the national Hispanic Scholarship Fund. Her telecommunications career included 16 years with AT&T. She was the company’s first Latina executive.

Two other Sprint board seats remain to be filled.

| The Star

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