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New York man gets three-year sentence for computer hacking

Updated: 2013-06-20T03:53:09Z

By MARK MORRIS

The Kansas City Star

A federal judge in Kansas City on Wednesday sentenced a New York man to three years in prison for his role in a university computer hacking scheme.

Joseph A. Camp, 29, pleaded guilty in April to conspiracy to commit computer fraud, admitting that he and another man hacked terminals at the University of Central Missouri, allowing them to view and download large databases of personal information, change grades and transfer money to their student accounts.

The judge, prosecutors and Camp’s defense lawyer had hoped to resolve all of Camp’s lingering legal issues Wednesday, including a federal identity fraud case in Rochester, N.Y. But Camp at the last minute pulled out of an anticipated plea agreement on the New York charges, opting instead to return to Rochester and resolve that case there.

The most time-consuming issue at Wednesday’s hearing was how much credit Camp would get for his pretrial detention against his total sentence. Camp entered federal custody in December 2009, when he was arrested on the New York charge.

Federal prosecutors in Kansas City charged him in November 2010, and he made his first appearance here in January 2011.

Camp insisted Wednesday that he be given credit for time served for all of that detention. Defense lawyer John Picerno and U.S. District Judge Brian Wimes explained that the U.S. Bureau of Prison settles time-served determinations. But Camp said he had received “guarantees” that he would be released immediately.

“No one can give guarantees,” Wimes said, sharply interrupting Camp. “The court didn’t give you guarantees. Ultimately the Bureau of Prisons makes that decision.”

To reach Mark Morris, call 816-234-4310 or send email to mmorris@kcstar.com.

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