Joco Diversions

Eating for life —A summer tradition gets an herbal makeover

Updated: 2013-05-28T21:30:00Z

By JILL WENDHOLT SILVA

The Kansas City Star

Corn on the cob slathered with butter is one of those all-American summer traditions we hold dear.

Of course, everybody has a certain way of marking the celebration. Some folks roll their cobs across a stick of butter; others are a bit more genteel and use a piece of bread spread with butter to rub across the kernels.

But if you really want to buck tradition, try The Star’s Grilled Corn-on-the-Cob With Creamy Herb Sauce instead.

First, the corn is grilled rather than boiled to highlight the natural sweetness. Then the gently roasted kernels are kissed with a delicious low-fat spread made from reduced-fat mayo and low-fat sour cream flecked with parsley, Parmesan and herbes de Provence.

Herbes de Provence (pronounced EHERB duh proh-VAWNS) is a blend of dried herbs typical of southern France and commonly contains basil, fennel seed, lavender, marjoram, rosemary, sage, summer savory and thyme. The fragrant mixture gives this summer fave a creamy and slightly decadent twist worth raving about.

Underneath it all, corn is a high-fiber, high-carbohydrate food that is low in fat and sodium. Corn also is a fair source of vitamin A. Finally, leaving the husk on the corn makes for a rather snazzy presentation. Or, as the French like to say: Ooh-la-la!

Shopping tip: Typically packed in miniature clay crocks, herbes de Provence can also be found in bottles at most large supermarkets.

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