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Missourian’s rich lifestyle wasn’t reported to the IRS

With a stated income of less than $20,000, man lived in a million-dollar house with a pool.

Updated: 2013-02-06T05:47:48Z

By MARK MORRIS

The Kansas City Star

Though his tax returns showed he struggled to get by, a Lexington, Mo., asphalt contractor’s lifestyle that included fine cars and a big house suggested otherwise.

Christopher Huffman, 49, pleaded guilty in federal court this week to filing a false income tax return.

Federal court records described the stark difference between the way Huffman lived and what he reported to the IRS.

Between 2006 and 2008, Huffman never reported more than $19,088 in annual income from his business, IG Construction, an asphalt and tree-trimming firm, according to federal court records.

Meanwhile, Huffman lived in a $1.6 million, 4,000-square-foot home equipped with a 13-car garage stocked with a Cadillac Escalade, two classic Chevrolet Camaros and a couple of Harley-Davidson motorcycles.

Huffman’s home also featured an in-ground pool and lake.

He slashed at his tax liability by claiming business expenses that were almost equal to his gross receipts, thus qualifying for an earned income tax credit intended for low to moderate earners.

He reported gross receipts of $752,550 in 2007 when his actual receipts were north of $1.3 million, court records showed.

In a 2008 loan application, Huffman claimed a salary of $100,000 and a net worth of almost $3 million, according to court records.

To reach Mark Morris, call 816-234-4310 or send email to mmorris@kcstar.com.

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