V4 Auto Section

Movie attack suspect got guns despite psychiatric issues

Updated: 2012-11-22T03:18:50Z

By HEATHER HOLLINGSWORTH

The Associated Press

A southwest Missouri man accused of plotting attacks at a movie theater and a Walmart legally bought the guns he allegedly planned to use despite being forced to undergo a psychiatric evaluation three years ago for stalking a store clerk he said he intended to kill, authorities said.

Blaec Lammers, 20, was arrested last week after his mother told police she feared he was planning an attack. Investigators who questioned him say he said he had bought a ticket to the latest “Twilight” movie on its opening weekend and planned to open fire on filmgoers before going to a nearby Walmart to shoot shoppers.

He is charged with first-degree assault, making a terroristic threat and armed criminal action, and remained jailed Wednesday on $500,000 bond.

The case against Lammers, of Bolivar, concerns gun-control advocates.

Lammers’ attorney, DeWayne Franklin Perry, declined to comment about the case. The National Rifle Association didn’t respond to a phone message seeking comment.

Lammers’ mother said this week that her son had undergone inpatient treatment and has shown signs associated with Asperger’s syndrome, borderline personality disorder and other conditions.

Since 1968, federal law has banned certain types of mentally ill people from buying guns, including those who have been deemed a danger to themselves or others, involuntarily committed or judged not guilty by reason of insanity or incompetent to stand trial.

Deal Saver Subscribe today!

Comments

The Kansas City Star is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Kansas City Star uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here