Campus Corner

Profiles of the 2012 National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame inductees

Updated: 2012-11-18T00:29:54Z

By BLAIR KERKHOFF

The Kansas City Star

Patrick Ewing

Career

One of the most dominant big men in the game’s history, Ewing led Georgetown to three Final Fours and the 1984 NCAA championship. He was the Most Outstanding Player in the 1984 Final Four, when the Hoyas defeated Kentucky and Houston. In 1985, Ewing won several major individual awards, including the Naismith and Rupp trophies as the game’s top player.

Beyond college

Ewing was the first overall selection in the 1985 NBA Draft by the Knicks and became an 11-time All-Star. He helped New York reach the NBA Finals in 1994 and in 1999 — although he didn’t play in the finals in ’99 because of an injury. Ewing was a two-time Olympic gold medalist, in 1984 and as a member of the original Dream Team in 1992. He was chosen one of the 50 greatest players in NBA history.

Did you know?

Ewing was born in Kingston, Jamaica, and grew up playing cricket and soccer.

Clyde Lovellette

Career

Among college basketball’s first great scoring big men, Lovellette remains the only player to lead the nation in scoring for an NCAA championship team, when he averaged 28.6 points for the 1952 Kansas Jayhawks. He was Kansas’ career scoring leader until Danny Manning passed him in 1988, and only Wilt Chamberlain averaged more points per game in a career than Lovellette’s 24.7

Beyond college

After helping the United States win a gold medal at the 1952 Olympics, Lovellette played in the AAU for Phillips 66 for one season and then went on to an 11-year NBA career. He was a four-time NBA All-Star and played for three NBA champions.

Did you know?

Lovellette was the first to play for an NCAA, Olympic and NBA champion.

Phil Ford

Career

An extraordinary point guard for North Carolina in the 1970s, Ford helped the Tar Heels reach the 1977 NCAA title game. In 1978, he won the John Wooden Award as the nation’s best player and left Chapel Hill as the program’s career scoring leader. The Tar Heels ran the four corners offense before his arrival, but Ford perfected it.

Beyond college

Ford spent his first four NBA seasons as a Kansas City King, and was chosen NBA Rookie of the Year in 1979. He served as a North Carolina assistant coach and radio commentator and recently started the Phil Ford Foundation to address the health concerns of overweight children.

Did you know?

In 1975, Ford was the first freshman to win the Everett Case Award as the MVP of the ACC Tournament.

Earl “The Pearl” Monroe

Career

Among the original spin-move masters, Monroe was unstoppable at Winston-Salem State, where he averaged 41.5 points in 1967 and was the Division II player of the year. The Rams, under legendary coach Clarence “Big House” Gaines, won the NCAA championship for college division teams that year, defeating Missouri State in the final.

Beyond college

Monroe took his remarkable talent to the NBA and was chosen Rookie of the Year with the Baltimore Bullets in 1968. He was a four-time All-Star and helped the New York Knicks to the 1973 NBA championship. He was chosen one of the 50 greatest players in NBA history, and his jersey was retired by the Knicks and Washington Wizards.

Did you know?

Monroe works with programs in Philadelphia to combat diabetes, including encouraging restaurants to create heart-healthy menus.

Willis Reed

Career

One of the NAIA greats, Reed scored 2,280 points and averaged 26.6 points and 21.3 rebounds per game in his Grambling career. His teams won three Southwestern Athletic Conference championships, and in 1961 the Tigers won the NAIA championship at Municipal Auditorium.

Beyond college

Reed was the 1965 NBA Rookie of the Year with the Knicks. He spent his entire NBA career in New York, helping the Knicks to two championships, and his appearance on the floor in game seven against the Lakers in 1970, when he was expected to miss his second straight game, stands as one of the game’s iconic moments. He was chosen one of the NBA’s 50 greatest players.

Did you know?

In that NBA Finals game in which Reed limped onto the floor, he scored only four points. But the inspired Knicks seized the day and the game.

Kenny Sailors

Career

Leaving your feet to shoot didn’t seem natural until Sailors did it for Wyoming in the 1940s, and he’s credited with being the father of the jump shot. He also led the Cowboys to glory, the 1943 NCAA title. Sailors then enlisted in the Marines and served in the South Pacific during World War II, but returned to Wyoming and resumed his All-America career.

Beyond college

Sailors played four seasons in the NBA and its forerunner, averaging 12.6 points. After leaving basketball, he worked as a rancher and established a successful guiding and outfitting business.

Did you know?

Sailors has a website, kennysailorsjumpshot.com, and there you can learn that he developed the move to shoot over an older brother, who was about 7 inches taller.

Joe B. Hall (coach)

Career

Asked to follow in the footsteps of Adolph Rupp at Kentucky, Hall, a Wildcats assistant, was up to the challenge and invigorated the program. He got Kentucky to the 1975 NCAA final and then won the championship in 1978. He added a third Final Four appearance in 1984. In 13 seasons in Lexington, Hall’s teams went 297-100, and his 1976 squad won the NIT.

Beyond college

In September, a statue of Hall was unveiled outside of the Wildcat Coal Lodge, where the current players live. Kentucky coach John Calipari noted that of the coaching greats in many sports — John Wooden, Vince Lombardi, Bear Bryant, Phog Allen and Rupp — only one successor won a championship: Hall.

Did you know?

Hall, who played on Kentucky’s 1949 NCAA title team, is one of just three men who coached and played for championship teams. Bob Knight and Dean Smith are the others.

Dave Robbins (coach)

Career

Robbins’ 1978 hiring at a historically black college, Virginia Union, was controversial because some said it denied an opportunity to a black coach. But nobody argued with the results. Robbins’ teams won 713 games, 13 Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association and three Division II championships. His program produced such NBA standouts as Ben Wallace and Charles Oakley.

Beyond college

Robbins retired from coaching in 2008, and he’s been collecting honors since. In 2010, Robbins was inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame.

Did you know?

Robbins was a cross-culture pioneer in college coaching. He previously had coached at predominantly black Thomas Jefferson High in Richmond.

Joe Dean (contributor)

Career

Dean was a three-time All-Southeastern Conference player at LSU, but he made his name in college basketball as a color analyst (he coined “string music”) and as a marketing and promotional representative for Converse, advocating basketball nationally and internationally. In 1987, Dean became LSU’s athletic director, a position he held until 2000.

Did you know?

After leaving LSU, Dean played for the Phillips 66ers in the AAU and wore No. 32. Clyde Lovellette had worn the same uniform number a couple of years earlier for the 66ers.

Jim Host (contributor)

Career

The NCAA Tournament has become one of the nation’s premier sports spectacles thanks to Host, who is being inducted as a contributor. Host is the founder and principal of Host Communications, implementing the first college sports corporate marketing program. Host handled all radio, marketing and publishing for the NCAA for more than three decades.

Did you know?

Host put together the Kentucky Radio Network in the early 1970s, and essentially started there when Joe B. Hall took over as the head coach.

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